Two Cell-Signaling Molecules Found to Suppress the Spread of Melanoma

In what is believed to be the largest epigenetic analysis to date of cell-signaling molecules in early-stage melanoma, researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and its Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center have identified two tiny bits of non-coding genetic material in primary tumors that appear critical to stalling the cancer’s spread—and essentially setting the biological fate of the disease. Reporting in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute online, researchers say that pinpointing these so-called “microRNAs” could provide the basis for future medical tests that identify those melanomas most likely to spread and kill. “Our study results show the suppressive effects of two specific microRNAs in melanoma that are less active in aggressive, primary tumors,” says senior study investigator Eva Hernando, PhD. Read more…


New Pathway for Stalling BRCA Tumor Growth Revealed

Inhibiting the action of a particular enzyme dramatically slows the growth of tumor cells tied to BRCA1 and BRCA2 genetic mutations which, in turn, are closely tied to breast and ovarian cancers, according to researchers at NYULMC. Senior investigator and cell biologist Agnel Sfeir, PhD, says that if further experiments prove successful, these findings could lead to a new class of targeted therapies against cancers with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. The researchers’ findings in experiments in mice and human cells are described in the journal Nature. Read more…